5 DIY Projects For First-Timers

I truly enjoy the challenge of creating new things for my home. I love the entire project, from idea, to planning, to building, and the finished product. It brings a sense of pride and accomplishment. That is why I am so excited to have Debbie Lewis sharing these 5 DIY projects for first-timers.

 

5 DIY Projects For First-Timers

 

With sites like Pinterest, Etsy, and Youtube, people are finding it easier to master DIY projects instead of buying an item or paying someone else to do it. If you’re new to DIY projects, these projects can ease you in and help you realize how fun and rewarding these projects can be.

Make a Jewelry Hanger

Image via Flickr by Charles & Hudson

If you have a lot of necklaces and bracelets getting tangled in a drawer, consider this simple DIY project to proudly display your jewelry. For the simplest version, buy screw-in wall hooks and a small two-by-four piece of wood. While that would suffice to hang your necklaces, you can inject some creativity by using a piece of drift wood or by painting the two-by-four. Instead of using basic wall hooks, you could also use an eclectic assortment of furniture knobs.

Reupholster your Furniture

If you have dining room chairs, a rocking chair, or — if you’re feeling particularly ambitious — a sofa that needs some TLC, consider reupholstering the furniture yourself. Head to a craft store and pick out the fabric you like. If it’s high-traffic furniture, make sure you buy a sturdy fabric. Using pliers, remove the staples holding the current fabric in place. Cut the fabric so it’s the right size and place it tightly around the frame. Staple the new fabric into place, and voilà, you have up-cycled your chairs.

Chalkboard Wall

A chalkboard is great for your kitchen or a child’s play area, but chalkboard paint gets expensive. Luckily, it’s easy to make your own chalkboard paint with latex paint and non-sanded grout. You may need a little trial and error to find the exact mix, but a good starting point is one part grout to eight parts paint. Just mix the two together, and you have your own chalkboard paint.

Upgrade a Dresser

Dressers are typically pricey, so consider refurbishing one you already own. If you want to start small, replace the hardware on an older dresser for an updated look. If you already own a dresser, sand it down and paint it, stain it, or white-wash it for a modern touch. You can also buy inexpensive dressers that are ready to be painted or stained to your desired color. Find hardware you like, and you have a modern and affordable dresser.

Build a Rolling Bar Cart

This project is manageable even for the novice handyman, but probably shouldn’t be your first DIY project. Once you’ve mastered smaller projects, it’s time to try this rolling bar cart. A rolling bar cart is the perfect accessory for any kitchen, and allows you to free up counter space while adding an attractive piece of furniture. For this project, you’ll need lumber, wheels, washers, screws, nails, and paint. You could also stain the wood. While this project certainly takes some time, the finished project is well worth it.

Start with small DIY projects. Once you’ve mastered them, you will feel more confidant to tackle bigger projects. Just be careful, because DIY projects get addicting, and soon you will have your whole home remodeled.

 

 

 

...

...

 

...

Share using our Hashtag!

 

Leave me a comment… I’d love to hear from you!

...

~Lorelai

 

Sign up today, and don't miss anything! Enjoy EXCLUSIVES, FREEBIES, and FUN.

 

...

 

Contact Lorelai at Lorelai@LifeWithLorelai.com

     

Homestead – Get Tips To Start Homesteading

Are you looking to start a homestead? Does a self-sufficient and sustainable lifestyle seem appealing to you? Then check out these tips on how to get started from our regular contributor, Megan Wild.

 

Tips on Starting a Homestead

Do you pass by quaint roadside stalls brimming with delectable fresh produce and wish you could live a peaceful, self-sufficient farm life? Do you already have a small vegetable or flower garden in your backyard because the idea of homegrown sustainability is one of your family’s goals? If so, you may be ready to start your own homestead!

Homesteading is a lifestyle that includes small-scale farming, animal husbandry, food preservation and textile or craft making. Don’t worry, you don’t have to dive right into all of those elements at once. It really is a lifestyle change that takes time and practice, but will ultimately result in the pride and satisfaction that you’re moving toward a life of self-reliance.

Here are some tips on how to transition into starting your own small homestead.

Get to Know Your Surroundings

Is your property able to support a homestead? You don’t need hundreds of acres, but you will need to do research to make sure you have enough sunlit space for your garden and a big enough pasture for any animals you wish to raise. It’s also extremely important to check with your local zoning board to ensure that everything will be up to code.

Get in touch with nature and learn what plants and natural structures surround your property. Are the local shrubs poisonous, or are they a natural medicine you can use at home? Is there a clean stream perfect for keeping cows watered as well as backup in case your well dries? What wild animals are native to your area, and are they a threat to your produce? These are just a few things to consider, and you will have to build your homesteading activities based on the land you have available.

Chickens and Goats and Cows, Oh My!

One of the biggest reasons people turn to homestead living is the growing concern over ethical animal treatment. By raising your own animals, you are in control over their happiness and the many uses they provide for you and your family.

Chickens are often the first animal homesteaders start with as they’re easy to maintain and don’t require large pastures. Not only do many people tout the taste of free-range eggs over commercial eggs, but studies show that free-range eggs are healthier for you overall. Watching chicks hatch, or looking for fresh eggs, are fun activities everyone in the family can participate in watching and doing. For chickens that no longer lay, you then have a cruelty-free source of poultry and feathers to be used whenever.

When it comes to meat and milk, cattle and goats are great for both. Just make sure you’re completely read up on the proper care and handling of any livestock you choose to own before you buy any. Once you have their pasture and housing situated, you can start going to auctions. Even if you don’t buy the first time, this is a great way to get a feel for what other experienced farmers do and the types of cattle you could buy. Don’t be afraid to speak to the sales manager at the auction, as they will help acquaint you with how things are run.

After your animals are settled in their new home, make sure you continue to look after their care. Get in touch with your local veterinarian before and after making any purchases. They can tell you what vaccinations are necessary and which warning signs you should watch for.

How Does Your Garden Grow?

Growing a vegetable garden is not so different from a flower garden. With careful planning, you can have both to utilize throughout the growing season. Tomatoes, squashes, peppers and beans are all easy starter vegetables. You don’t have to sacrifice the beauty of a regular floral garden — consider switching to colorful herbs such as lavender or chamomile or even rose varieties that produce large hips, which are great for brewing in tea. Let your children participate in the digging and planting when you first get started. It’ll make hunting for hidden vegetable bounty under the leaves all that much more rewarding.

You want to make sure you benefit from your garden year round, so dry or can your produce properly when you’re not eating it fresh. This will help you cut back on wasted veggies that aren’t eaten in time when your crop really booms. You’ll also stock your shelves for the winter.

Attitude Is Everything

Finally — and most importantly — remember that it takes patience and an open mind to change into this new lifestyle. You may make mistakes, and you may fall on hard times. However, the benefits truly outweigh the costs when you earn your self-sufficiency.

Once you get the hang of it, you’ll find homestead life to be extremely rewarding and you’ll thank yourself for all the hard work you put into it.

 

~Megan

Visit Megan at her blog, Your Wild Home!

 

 

...

...

 

...

Share using our Hashtag!

 

Leave me a comment… I’d love to hear from you!

...

~Lorelai

 

Sign up today, and don't miss anything! Enjoy EXCLUSIVES, FREEBIES, and FUN.

 

...

 

Contact Lorelai at Lorelai@LifeWithLorelai.com